How was meat prepared and preserved before refrigeration in such a way that lent itself to tenderness?

Or is it simply a matter of the meat itself and if you get chewy meat there’s nothing you can do about it.

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6 Responses to “How was meat prepared and preserved before refrigeration in such a way that lent itself to tenderness?”

  1. Happy Gramps said:

    From Biblical times up until ice was invented, meat was heavily salted to preserve and season it

  2. William said:

    Canned and salted, mostly canned, they didn’t have fancy dehydrators.

  3. Ali said:

    Yes by using Salts or in Cold Countries by burying it in Ice. Salting would have lent itself well to tenderness but obviously by freezing foods if possible this would have have been ideal for tenderness…

  4. pyjamatop said:

    It was salted, and hung in a very cold place.Most large houses centuries ago had their own ice houses which enabled them to make ice-cream long before refridgeration came along.

  5. Kath said:

    It was hung in a cool, ventilated place for a period of days. Good butchers still do this, except that it’s done in a ‘cool room’ now rather than a shed or barn. (Dodgy butchers and supermarket chains may save money by shortening the hanging period.)

    There’s also different ways of preparing it to improve the meat of older animals – Mum used to talk about ‘old boiler’ hens which would be stewed for ages instead of roasting.

  6. Rick said:

    That’s how sausage came to be, as a way to preserve meat. The meat was ground, mixed with strong spices, and then dried to preserve it.




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