I’m cooking a standing rib roast for Christmas. The recipe says let it stand for at least 1 hr before roasting?

Is it ok to leave it out for about 3 hrs while we’re going out visiting family? Otherwise I’ll have to take it out when we get home then we won’t be eating till very late. I’ve never cooked one of these before so any help is appreciated!

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7 Responses to “I’m cooking a standing rib roast for Christmas. The recipe says let it stand for at least 1 hr before roasting?”

  1. Shantal said:

    Yes the 3 hours will be fine.

  2. Julianna said:

    Doesn’t sound safe. The 1 hour is for the meat to come to room temp prior to roasting. Depending upon room temp., 3hrs could start it to break down and lose juices. Plan on having snacks and drinks when you come home for the first hour, maybe talk, play cards or a game. It will be worth the wait to do it right.
    Good luck!

  3. teri said:

    a half hour before you go out, put the roast in the freezer.
    this will give it an additional chilling, without actually freezing it.
    then leave it out for the 3 hours to get to room temperature so it will roast evenly.

    if it is a large roast, like 3 ribs or more, you won’t even have to give it the extra chill.
    it will be fine.

  4. Pumpkin DBAB said:

    Depending on the size, it should be fine. I usually leave mine out for at least a few hours to bring to room temperature, but on the other hand, I am usually doing a fairly large roast.

    Good luck :)!

  5. mmac676 said:

    Directions:

    Trimming Excess Fat: Trim roast of excess fat, but not the thin layer of fat the butcher leaves on the roast to protect and baste it while it cooks. Excess fat means any fat more than one (1) inch thick. The fat provides the flavor and what you are paying for with prime rib, so leave it on.

    Room Temperature: To cook evenly, the roast must not be cold – let it stand at room temperature, loosely covered, for about 2 hours. (If you don’t let the roast come to room temperature, if will take longer to cook your roast. Your roast won’t cook evenly, and you’ll end up with well-done slices on the end and raw meat in the center.)

    Previously Frozen: If your rib roast is frozen, let it thaw completely in the refrigerator. Remove the roast from the refrigerator about 2 hours before cooking to let it come to room temperature.

    Tying Up Prime Rib: It is important to tie the prime rib before roasting. If left untied, the outer layer of meat will pull away from the rib-eye muscle and overcook. To prevent this problem, tie the roast a both ends, running the cooking twine parallel to the bone. Most butchers will tie your rib roast for you.

    At Cooks.com contradicts the above by stating to let the roast stand for 1 hour prior to cooking.

    Either way you look at thing I think 3 hours would be to long to leave meat of on the counter.
    The longer time is probably for a large seven rib, 15lb roast and the shorter time for a 3 or
    4 rib roast at 7 to 8 lbs

  6. Cupcake's Princess said:

    The cardinal rule of food safety is that food shouldn’t be in “the danger zone” for a total of more than four hours. The danger zone is between 40 and 140 degrees F. The time is cumulative, so if the roast was over 40 degrees for any other time before you put it in your fridge (like when you were transporting it home), you have to count that time, too. I think you’re cutting it too close, especially if you get caught late at the family’s. Food poisoning is not a good Christmas present. I’d rather skip the resting time (though the roast will be much juicier and more tender if you do that step) than to leave it out for 3+ hours.

  7. yu.v.melnike said:




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