What was the quickest and easiest way for you to learn guitar chords?

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6 Responses to “What was the quickest and easiest way for you to learn guitar chords?”

  1. Xavier said:

    when i first started playing i really wanted to give up just because its kind of hard to learn. but what helped me was slowly moving into it like finding easy things to play and the easy things correspond with the harder stuff. and one thing that helped me with my barr chords was playing them the Hendrix way, with the thumb.

  2. Jake Skywalker said:

    Practice, it’s the ONLY way, well unless you weant to sell your soul to satan like Robert Johnson.

  3. Skye said:

    I do it in chord progressions, like A, D, then E, and I just repeat it and repeat it until my fingers get used to it 😉 Try starting slowly and then get faster. Oh, and don’t always use the same order, try going backwards or changing it up somehow otherwise you’ll only be able to play them in a certain way… :/

  4. Kirsty ;] said:

    Well, i could come up with lots of techniques that people will give you, but here’s one way that’s sure to help: play your guitar.
    The longer you spend with it, the easier it gets, and it truly will get easier.
    You just have to practise the chords, slowly, change between them. If what you need is help remembering them, again, just keep playing them over and over and say the name of the chord as you play it, soon it’ll be jammed into your head.

    Chords aren’t something that you will be instantly good at, it’s all about muscle memory, repeating something so many times that eventually your hands do it by default.

  5. Jack Bauer said:

    As someone else mentioned, it’s all about muscle memory. The more you practice, the easier it gets.

    A fun little exercise I used to do is choosing one chord each day. Learn and memorize the chord, play it, then take your hand off of the fretboard. Fret the chord again, and repeat. Do this for 5-10 minutes, and by the end, it should get much easier to play a chord. As you improve, you can even do multiple chords per day.

    You should start by learning major/minor chords. Then learn the 7th chords (dominant, major, minor, min7b5). Next learn the barre chord versions of all the above chords mentioned. Next, learn sus and add chords (open and barre positions), especially if you will be playing a lot of rock. Next, learn slash chords. These are the most common types of chords found in rock, pop, blues, etc.

  6. LucasMan said:

    Somebody shows you which notes to play, what type of chord it is, and you just remember.

    The first chords people learn are usually C, G, D, Dm, E, Em, A, and Am. Those are all “open” chords, which means they use open strings. After that, people usually learn to play “barre” chords, which involve using your first finger to hold down all the strings and play a chord above that. These shapes are similar to E and A open chords… people usually learn B, Bm, F, and Fm barre chords first.

    After that, you really don’t need to “remember” any more chords, it’s better to actually learn how chords work at that point. Once you actually understand how chords work, you’re not really memorizing a bunch of shapes any more… if you run into a chord that you don’t know, you can figure it out!




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